print logo

Global Voices: Fair Trade

 Street News Service 06 December 2019

When Fair Trade products first came on the market, the concept was celebrated globally for providing an earnest income to local farmers and producers. However, the Institute of Economic Affairs (IEA) recently announced that the world’s poorest countries do not benefit enough from fair trade. Heavy administration requirements mean that for some it is close to impossible to work under the Fair Trade banner. (462 Words) - By Staff Writer

Share

GVDEC2010 _ Tercia McGrath

Tercia McGrath - Cape Town, South Africa. Photo: The Big Issue South Africa

GVDEC2010 _ Maddie Richardson

Maddie Richardson - Ballarat, Australia. Photo: The Big Issue Australia

GVDEC2010 _ Nick Hall

Nick Hall - Melbourne, Australia. Photo: The Big Issue Australia.

GVDEC2010 _ Wanjiru Mbiruru

Wanjiru Mbiruru - Nairobi, Kenya. Photo: The Big Issue Kenya

GVDEC2010 _ Tom Healy

Tom Healy - Dublin, Ireland. Photo: Ireland's Big Issue

GVDEC2010 _ Pam Walcott

Pam Walcott - Somerville, Massachusetts. Photo: Spare Chnage News


Do you buy Fair Trade products and what effect do you think they have on the consumer market?

 

Name: Tom Healy
Age:
55
Occupation:
Engineering Lecturer
City of Residence:
Dublin, Ireland

"Do I buy Fairtrade? Sometimes. If the price is similar I will give the benefit of the doubt and purchase Fair Trade.  I believe consumers are sceptical about the honesty of the Fair Trade programme."

 

Name: Pam Walcott
Age:
42
Occupation:
Works at Massachusetts Institute of Technology
City of Residence:
Somerville, Massachusetts, USA

"I buy Fairtrade products because it says that the person who's growing or providing it is getting a fair wage. I don't know what affect it has had on the consumer market, because fair trade products cost more but that makes sense if they're paying a fair wage."

 

Name: Nick Hall
Age:
27
Occupation:
Works in Transportation and Logistics
City of Residence:
Melbourne

"If it's available, I'll go for Fair Trade, but I don't actively seek it out. I'm a bit suspicious of who's actually benefiting from things like that. I think a lot of people are suspicious of that."

 

Name: Maddie Richardson
Age:
19
Occupation:
Law student
City of Residence:
Ballarat, Australia

"I do buy Fair Trade products. I think more and more people do, to feel good about themselves for doing the right thing. That might make big companies consider going Fair Trade."

 

Name: Wanjiru Mbiruru
Age:
27
Occupation:
Communications officer-GTZ-Sudan office
City of Residence:
Nairobi

"I sometimes buy fairtrade. I think fairtrade had led to an increase or establishment of ethical consumerism; where people shop for products they feel are politically correct and ethical.  The 'making a difference' slogan has become common place in almost all aspects of life."

 

Name: Tercia McGrath
Age:
27
Occupation:
Administrator for an Estate Agent
City of Residence:
Cape Town

"I don't buy fair-trade because other products are cheaper. They're also not advertised enough. Fairtrade has little effect on the consumer market because plenty of South Africans don't have the luxury of choice, especially when it comes to food."

SNS logo
  • Website Design