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Workshop with vendors: how to prevent HIV/AIDS

 Clin d'œil (Burundi) 11 July 2019

The Burundian street paper Clin d’œil organised a workshop about HIV/AIDS and behavior change. Directed at their vendors, the workshop focused on forms of HIV transmission and methods of prevention. (318 Words) - By Jean Baptisme Niyongabo

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clin d'oeil-on appris aux vendeurs du magazine clin d'oeil comment le VIHSIDA s'attrape et les méthodes de le combattre 1

Workshop with Clin d'Oeil vendors about the dangers and prevention of HIV/AIDS.Photo courtesy of Clin d'Oeil

clin d'oeil-on appris aux vendeurs du magazine clin d'oeil comment le VIHSIDA s'attrape et les méthodes de le combattre 2

Workshop with Clin d'Oeil vendors about the dangers and prevention of HIV/AIDS.Photo courtesy of Clin d'Oeil


During the workshop, the young vendors were worried and happy at the same time; worried because they realized that they were faced with a dangerous virus which is difficult to combat, and happy as they learnt many useful things that will allow them to prevent HIV.

This does not mean that these young people did not have any information about HIV, but the little knowledge they had about it was not enough and could have been misused. One of them said that as he does a lot of sports he would have detected the disease, because his performance would be less efficient than before. Responding to that, the expert, Mr. Blaise Gahunhu, legal representative of "l'Association Burundaise pour le maintien de l'Unité au sein de la Jeunesse" (ABJE), explained that up to now there are three ways to transmit HIV: non protected sexual intercourses, from a pregnant mother to her baby during pregnancy, and the use of non sterilized sharp tools who have been used by an infected person. He also added that HIV screening is the only way to detect it.

During this discussion, the vendors raised their concerns about pedophilia and the risks of rape are for young girls or women who walk in dark streets of the city. They admitted the workshop gave them the chance to learn about this virus and they promised to share the information with their friends on the streets.

At the end, Blaise Gahungu, the legal representative of ABJE, and his colleagues from the same association welcomed the initiative, as well as the support that street papers in general, and Clin d'Oeil in particular give to poor people.

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