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Photo Essay: The other side of India’s IT capital (part 2)

 INSP 20 February 2019

Call centres, futuristic IT campuses and explosive growth have come to dominate Bangalore’s global image in recent years. For the two million people still living in poverty, this picture could not be further from reality. Photographer Simon Murphy travelled across the city to see the other side of India’s ‘Silicon Valley’. (224 Words) - By Danielle Batist/ Photos by Simon Murphy

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A family travels to work by scooter in Bangalore. With India’s growing middle class buying cars and scooters, congestion is one of the biggest problems of the urban areas.Photo: Simon Murphy

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A women does her laundry outside her house in the Bangalore slums. Some areas of the slums have improved after residents managed to find jobs in the city centre. Despite this, 2 million citizens still live below the poverty line.Photo: Simon Murphy

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Rubbish collectors clear garbage from the streets of Bangalore, just metres from the city’s commercial district. The huge growth of India’s IT capital has failed to lift millions of citizens out of poverty.Photo: Simon Murphy

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Rubbish collectors clear garbage from the streets of Bangalore, just metres from the city’s commercial district. The huge growth of India’s IT capital has failed to lift millions of citizens out of poverty.Photo: Simon Murphy

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Morning rush hour in Bangalore.Photo: Simon Murphy

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Cows roam the public garbage belt in the slums of Bangalore. The rubbish dumps across the city are a breeding ground for diseases.Photo: Simon Murphy

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A child at work in an iron work shop in the slums of Bangalore. Despite government efforts to provide schooling for children, many slum kids have to work to help provide income for their families.Photo: Simon Murphy

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Food stalls under one of Bangalore’s newly constructed fly-overs. Across the city, redevelopments are taking place to deal with the huge congestion problems.Photo: Simon Murphy

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A child in the slums of Bangalore.Photo: Simon Murphy

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Children in the streets of a Bangalore slum.Photo: Simon Murphy

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A disabled man rests outside a shop in a Bangalore slum. Accessibility is a major problem for people with disabilities in the slums.Photo: Simon Murphy

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Burning garbage on a rubbish belt in the Bangalore slums. The rubbish dumps across the city are a breeding ground for diseases.Photo: Simon Murphy

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A boy on the outskirts of the Bangalore slum where he lives. The city’s slum areas are expanding at a rapid phase.Photo: Simon Murphy

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A boy on the streets of the Bangalore slum where he lives.Photo: Simon Murphy

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A child outside his home in a Bangalore slum. Despite government efforts to provide schooling for children, many slum kids do not go to school because their parents cannot afford the school fees.Photo: Simon Murphy


To download high res images, please click on 'Download Gallery Images' button above. To download part 1 of this photo essay, click here.

The UN predicted that by 2030, the towns and cities of the developing world will make up 81 per cent of urban humanity. Disparity between rich and poor citizens in these cities is huge, and bridging these gaps will be one of the biggest challenges of the next century. Last year's official Census of India statistics showed that Bangalore's district population rose a staggering 47 per cent in just ten years, making it the second fastest growing city in India, after Delhi.

The Indian Institute of Science estimates that Bangalore has about 30 per cent of all IT workforce in the country. Global corporations like Infosys, with 60,000 employees moving around a high tech campus in golf carts, have drastically changed the city's - as well as the country's - image. American Express released a report in 2007, revealing that Bangalore is home to 10,000 millionaires and 60,000 near-millionaires. At the same time, about a quarter of the city's 8.4 million citizens still live in slums, with 20 per cent living below the poverty line.

 

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