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Turning the tide

 The Big Issue South Africa 04 November 2019

Long-distance swimmer Lewis Pugh has swam in some of the most exotic and extreme places on Earth. After swimming to Robben Island in South Africa at just 17, the British-born athlete gave up a career in maritime law to become a full time swimmer. He has since swam in sea at the North pole and dived into a glacial lake on Mount Everest. During a 27 year career in water, he’s also seen glaciers melting and oceans change for the worse and he worries about the impact of climate-change, over-fishing, and pollution. He speaks to Bartlett of The Big issue South Africa about making a difference to save the planet and his next project, a three year expedition crossing three oceans and 18 seas. (2437 Words) - By Bartlett

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BI SA_Turning the tide 1

Lewis Pugh.Photo: Jac Kritzinger

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Lewis Pugh.Photo: Jac Kritzinger

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Lewis Pugh.Photo: Jac Kritzinger

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In the last 13 years, numbers of African Penguins have dropped from 100 000 to 60 000, down from three and four million 100 years ago.Photo: Jac Kritzinger


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