print logo
  • Username:
    Password:

When existing in public becomes illegal

 The Contributor - USA 09 September 2019

Is it a crime to be poor? When Charlotte, a homeless woman living on the streets of Nashville, Tennessee, USA, was found rummaging through a rubbish bin by a police officer, she was arrested and spent two days in jail. Charlotte had fallen foul of a “criminal trespassing” law and unfortunately her story is not unusual in modern America. In order to highlight the increasing criminalization of homelessness, The Contributor documented the personal accounts of seventeen other homeless people who were charged and questioned the legitimacy of a system that responds to poverty with handcuffs rather than homes. (7495 Words) - By Andrew Krinks

Michael Hutchison

8. Michael Hutchison.Photo: Tasha French Lemley

Jerry Jackson

Jerry Jackson.Photo: Tasha French Lemley

Don Nash

Don Nash.Photo: Tasha French Lemley

Michael Reed

Michael Reed.Photo: Tasha French Lemley

John Holder (Dr. John)1

John Holder (Dr. John).Photo: Tasha French Lemley

John Holder (Dr. John)2

John Holder (Dr. John).Photo: Tasha French Lemley

Eric Jobe

Eric Jobe.Photo: Tasha French Lemley

Michael Moore

Michael Moore.Photo: Tasha French Lemley

Ernest Flanagan

Ernest Flanagan.Photo: Tasha French Lemley

Tina Carter (McKinney)

Tina Carter (McKinney).Photo: Tasha French Lemley

Alan Cobb

Alan Cobb.Photo: Tasha French Lemley

Charles Francis

Charles Francis.Photo: Tasha French Lemley

David Jock

David Jock.Photo: Tasha French Lemley

Anthony Gunter

Anthony Gunter.Photo: Tasha French Lemley

Frank Clements

Frank Clements.Photo: Tasha French Lemley

Benny Crews

Benny Crews.Photo: Tasha French Lemley

Doc Mothershed

Doc Mothershed.Photo: Tasha French Lemley

William McClain

William McClain.Photo: Tasha French Lemley


This content is only available to members (street press publications). Members can log in above to view full text.

Recently added

SNS logo
  • Website Design