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How frogs and fish can help us learn to freeze humans

 The Conversation 08 June 2019

From Star Wars and Alien to Futurama, the idea that humans can be frozen in time in order to be awoken later is a well-established sci-fi trope. While stopping biological time or inducing long-term hibernation is still as far off as the long-distance space travel that it’s associated with, the research around it is of huge scientific and medical importance, says chemistry professor Matthew Gibson. His research is inspired by the so called antifreeze glycoproteins that enable frogs and fish to survive in subzero temperatures – and he points out that we can already freeze and store cells, tissues and organs. (846 Words) - By Matthew Gibson - Assistant Professor, Department of Chemistry, Warwick University at University of Warwick, UK

The Conversation_Frogs

Golden frogs (Phyllobates terribilis) in the Explora park in Medellin, Columbia. Research inspired by the so called antifreeze glycoproteins that enable frogs to survive in subzero temperatures could hold the key to freezing humans.  Credit: REUTERS/Fredy Amariles

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