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New forensic weapon developed to track illegal ivory trade

 IPS 02 March 2019

The wildlife trade monitoring network, TRAFFIC, is deploying a new forensic weapon – DNA testing – to track illegal ivory products responsible for the slaughter of hundreds of endangered elephants in Asia and Africa. Widely used in criminal cases, forensic DNA examination can help identify whether the elephant tusk is from Asia or Africa. The project is a collaborative effort between Thailand’s Department of National Parks, Wildlife and Plant Conservation (DNP) and TRAFFIC, to battle the widespread illegal trade of ivory in Thailand. (776 Words) - By Thalif Deen

IPS_Combatting illegal ivory trade 2

Seized illegal ivory elephant charms are displayed as New York's District Attorney Cyrus Vance speaks during a news conference to announce the guilty pleas of two ivory dealers and their business for selling illegal elephant ivory, in New York July 12, 2019. Photo: REUTERS/Keith Bedford

IPS_Combatting illegal ivory trade 1

A baby elephant walks between two adults in the plains of the Masai Mara game reserve. The wildlife trade monitoring network, TRAFFIC, is deploying a new forensic weapon – DNA testing – to track illegal ivory products responsible for the slaughter of hundreds of endangered elephants in Asia and Africa. Photo: REUTERS/Laszlo Balogh

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5. A policeman arranges seized elephant tusks to be inspected at Makupa police station in Mombasa June 5, 2019. Photo: Reuters/Joseph Okanga

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A pair of elephants walk through scrub in the dusk light in Pilanesberg National Park in South Africa's North West Province April 19, 2019. Photo: REUTERS/Mike Hutchings


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