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Photo series: Living on Rubbish

 Reuters 30 March 2019

Cambodia is home to world famous ancient sites such as Angkor Wat, Angkor Thom and Bayonne. Tourists from all over the world flock to photograph these jungle temples. But a rather less glamourous site is now grabbing tourists’ attention. Anlong Pi, an eight-hectare dumpsite situated close to the famous Cambodian resort province of Siem Reap, has recently become an attraction in its own right. Sightseers pose for pictures with children who scavenge scraps for a living, making between $0.25 and $2 per day, according to a representative of a company overseeing the waste. Reuters photographer Athit Perawongmetha documented the daily lives of the people scraping out a living at the landfill. (111 Words) - By INSP Staff

Reuters_Landfill Anlong Pi 4

People search for usable items after a truck unloaded garbage at dumpsite outside Siem Reap March 19, 2019. Anlong Pi, an eight-hectare dumpsite situated close to the famous Cambodian resort province of Siem Reap, has recently become a tourist attraction in its own right. Sightseers pose for pictures with children who scavenge scraps for a living, making between $0.25 and $2 per day, according to a representative of a company overseeing the waste.Photo: REUTERS/Athit Perawongmetha

Reuters_Landfill Anlong Pi 1

A woman searches for usable items among garbage at dumpsite outside Siem Reap March 19, 2019. Anlong Pi, an eight-hectare dumpsite situated close to the famous Cambodian resort province of Siem Reap, has recently become a tourist attraction in its own right. Sightseers pose for pictures with children who scavenge scraps for a living, making between $0.25 and $2 per day, according to a representative of a company overseeing the waste.Photo: REUTERS/Athit Perawongmetha

Reuters_Landfill Anlong Pi 2

People search for usable items after a truck unloaded garbage at dumpsite outside Siem Reap March 19, 2019. Anlong Pi, an eight-hectare dumpsite situated close to the famous Cambodian resort province of Siem Reap, has recently become a tourist attraction in its own right. Sightseers pose for pictures with children who scavenge scraps for a living, making between $0.25 and $2 per day, according to a representative of a company overseeing the waste.Photo: REUTERS/Athit Perawongmetha

Reuters_Landfill Anlong Pi 3

People search for usable items as a truck unloads garbage at dumpsite outside Siem Reap March 19, 2019. Anlong Pi, an eight-hectare dumpsite situated close to the famous Cambodian resort province of Siem Reap, has recently become a tourist attraction in its own right. Sightseers pose for pictures with children who scavenge scraps for a living, making between $0.25 and $2 per day, according to a representative of a company overseeing the waste.Photo: REUTERS/Athit Perawongmetha

Reuters_Landfill Anlong Pi 5

Soburn, an 11-year-old girl, collects what can be used as food for pigs at landfill dumpsite outside Siem Reap March 19, 2019. A second-grade student, she helps her parents in the morning collecting usable items at the dumpsite where they live before going to school in the afternoon.Photo: REUTERS/Athit Perawongmetha

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Saray, 23-year-old woman wearing a head torch holds her one-year-old daughter Phearom after working at a landfill dumpsite outside Siem Reap March 18, 2019. Saray moved to the dumpsite five years ago after marrying a man who lives there. She makes $2 per day collecting usable items at the dumpsite.Photo: REUTERS/Athit Perawongmetha

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A boy listens to music from his mobile phone while resting after working at a landfill dumpsite Siem Reap March 18, 2019. Anlong Pi, an eight-hectare dumpsite situated close to the famous Cambodian resort province of Siem Reap, has recently become a tourist attraction in its own right. Sightseers pose for pictures with children who scavenge scraps for a living, making between $0.25 and $2 per day, according to a representative of a company overseeing the waste.Photo: REUTERS/Athit Perawongmetha

Reuters_Landfill Anlong Pi 8

A woman looks at an item found among garbage at a landfill dumpsite outside Siem Reap March 18, 2019. Anlong Pi, an eight-hectare dumpsite situated close to the famous Cambodian resort province of Siem Reap, has recently become a tourist attraction in its own right. Sightseers pose for pictures with children who scavenge scraps for a living, making between $0.25 and $2 per day, according to a representative of a company overseeing the waste.Photo: REUTERS/Athit Perawongmetha

Reuters_Landfill Anlong Pi 9

A headlamp leaves a light trace on a long exposure picture as a person looks for usable items at a landfill dumpsite outside Siem Reap March 18, 2019. Anlong Pi, an eight-hectare dumpsite situated close to the famous Cambodian resort province of Siem Reap, has recently become a tourist attraction in its own right. Sightseers pose for pictures with children who scavenge scraps for a living, making between $0.25 and $2 per day, according to a representative of a company overseeing the waste. Photo: REUTERS/Athit Perawongmetha


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